Dress Codes

Dress Codes:

Shipboard dress is casual during the day. Shorts and tasteful T-shirts are acceptable even in the dining room. At dinner, dress codes will vary daily, among the following:

Casual: Slacks and sport shirt for men (no jeans); slacks and blouse, sundress or pantsuit for women.
Informal: Jacket with or without tie for men; dress or pantsuit for women.
Formal: Dark suit or tuxedo for men; evening gown or cocktail dress for women.

Most 3- and 4-day cruises have one formal night; most 7-day cruises have 2 formal nights; most 10-day cruises have 3 formal nights, and so on. In general, the longer and more expensive (per day) cruises will be the most formal on formal night, but a dark suit and tie is acceptable attire on even the most exclusive ships. (In other words, don’t buy a tuxedo for a single cruise).

Packing

Packing for a cruise is like packing for any resort-based vacation. You’ll want to bring comfortable, casual clothing for daytime on board and in port, and swimsuits and workout clothes for pools, Jacuzzis, saunas and health clubs.

Think about the kind of shore excursions you may take and pack accessories, where appropriate, such as hiking boots, ponchos or rain gear, fleece jackets and snorkel gear.

Pack all of your medications, prescription or otherwise, in a bag you can carry onto your flights. Obtain extra prescriptions from your physician for any medications you are currently taking and carry them with you.

Most ships have 110-volt outlets in every cabin, which will accommodate U.S.-built hairdryers, travel irons and electric shavers. Most new ships provide hairdryers as well.

Bring a hat, sunscreen and sunglasses for bright, sunny days on deck. You’ll have many opportunities to have your picture taken by the ship’s photographers, but you’ll naturally want to bring your own camera or video camera as well.